FedEx Newsroom

FedEx Newsroom

FedEx Express Cologne Hub Celebrates Five Years Of Keeping Businesses Globally Connected

Central and Eastern Europe Gateway has Steadily Grown, Today Employing More Than 680 Team Members

October 13, 2015

COLOGNE, GERMANY, October 13, 2015—FedEx Express, a subsidiary of FedEx Corp. (NYSE: FDX) and the world’s largest express transportation company, celebrates five years of operations this autumn at its international hub at Cologne/Bonn, Germany.

Since the move from Frankfurt/Main to Cologne in 2010, the Cologne hub has grown steadily in capacity, increasing from 35 employees to more than 680. It is a vital facility in the FedEx worldwide network, acting as a central gateway for shipments arriving by ground or air from Central and Eastern Europe and providing fast connectivity within Europe, to the U.S. and Asia.

The hub´s automated sorting system can process up to 18,000 documents and packages an hour and plays a key part in keeping businesses connected to more than 220 countries and territories worldwide.

“Our Cologne facility is one of the most modern FedEx hubs worldwide. We are proud that our operation plays such an important role, not just in Europe, but globally,” said Stefan Dries, managing director, Operations, FedEx Express Europe. “We have employees from 37 nations at our hub—and it is really the people that are at the heart of our operations. Our growth and success is testament to their continued dedication,” he continued.

Today, 30 of FedEx 58 weekly flights to and from Cologne Bonn Airport are operated with the most modern aircraft of the FedEx fleet, the Boeing 777 (B777F). FedEx was the first airline to regularly serve Cologne Bonn Airport with a B777F. The aircraft generates 18 per cent less CO2 emissions and is significantly quieter compared to the MD-11, which is an alternative for long-haul flights.

Furthermore, the roof features one of the largest FedEx Express solar power plants. It has an area of 16,000 square meters and produces about 800,000 kilowatt hours per year—enough energy to power roughly 230 three-person households for an entire year.

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